About your Search

20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
to be the best of all pleasures to introduce dr. beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care system. i bet you have been very busy during this political season. with the debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health-care rights, being in the air everywhere we look. as a person addicted to both politics and academic and women's history, i and i'm sure all of us are interested in this presentation so thanks for being here. you couldn't be in a better counter this talky their since much of grand rapids has been very highly invested in the health-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of
senator mark warner on his plan to allow more highly-skilled immigrants into the u.s. at 8 eastern on c-span2, the president and incoming ceo of the nation's second biggest provider of medicare health plans, and at 8 eastern on c-span3, a discussion on scientific predictions about the future and the impact they have on public policy. .. but i think that there's no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but it is something -- there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to say is you have to learn to pay that and that's exactly what the reagan administration did when they found themselves with somebody they can do business with. it could and ronald reagan may have been the only guy in the administration that believed in the near option that by god u.n. after. and here i ha
. my father had been a career army officer for a period in the u.s. army and served in world war ii and korea and later became a hospital administrator. >> so you say conservative, orthodox conservative reform? >> right in the middle. >> did you fight in the 1967 war? >> i was a kid. >> you were a kid. did you fight any war? >> i fought in a couple of them, yes. i fought in the lebanon war. i was quite involved in the lebanon war. i served in the israeli paratroopers. i was in the israeli special forces. >> what year? >> june 1982. wars in the middle east occurred in june, almost to the day. it's probably a good war- fighting weather. i was among the first forces to -- of israeli forces to enter the city of beirut in june 1982. my actual unit was decimated in an ambush and we ended up being attached to all sorts of other units for the duration of the war. later on, i became one of the few israelis to be a veteran of the gulf war. in a period just before the outbreak of the gulf war, i was assigned as a strategic liaison between the army and the u.s. fleet. in the book, i went out th
the task here in washington is going to be very difficult to convince her u.s. government to change the way it has done business for 30 years because a lot of the strategic and current imperatives drive our security. how do you actually play the right role of engaging your? it's not naƏvely giving money to liberal groups and things like this are not having a strategy. i do believe that this is a significant test inside of egypt. it's an encouraging sign, and i think, this is my prediction and were rob and others may disagree, is that it's going to force islamist political parties at least elements of the to change their ideology, if the system remains open and that's the big if, if there's a big debate i don't see it going backwards in terms of the diversity we see in egypt as large as it is it's hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> okay, we are going to move to our closing remarks and we're going to go in reverse order, so bret, you can have two minutes to make a final plea. >> yeah, in 1979 jean kirkpatrick wrote an influential article, dictatorships and double standards, in w
of u.s. aid $3 billion annually. israel is also an occupying power, born of war in which two thirds of the indigenous population was driven from their land, israel went on to expand its borders further in 1967 when it conquered the west bank, the gaza strip and golan heights. there are half a million jewish settlers in the occupied territories who enjoy all manner of state subsidies and privileges while palestinians under occupation suffer indignities and humiliation too numerous to mention. the situation is not much better for palestinian citizens in israel who are increasingly treated as a fifth column despite their loyalty that the state has shown little affection over the years. israel's occupation is the longest in modern history and the israeli government appears to be in no hurry to end it particularly if it can change the topic to iran's nuclear program or the threat of islam. unconditional support for israel is not the only reason the united states is viewed with suspicion and hostility in much of the arab and muslim world but certainly one of the reasons and a very big one
atmosphere of the city. albany, known as one of the most populace cities in the u.s. in 1810, is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state university of new york, the albany the law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and wha
next, author, dr. and u.s. senator tom coburn, acclaimed author of breach of trust, talks about long-term deficit reduction, health care, the future of the republican party and more. .. >> guest: that he could not raise the adequate amount of wheat that he wanted to. because the government had decided they were going to control wheat plantings. and so what he said was, okay, then i can raise wheat for my chickens. and he took it all the way to the supreme court and lost that battle. >> host: why do you recount that story in "the debt bomb"? >> guest: because it's a great example on the enumerated powers and the unwinding -- why do we find ourself in the place we're in now? how'd we get here, what do by -- we do about it, and what are the ramifications? the greatest way for the government to make something expensive is for the government to make it affordable. and all you have to do is look at the programs. what were the average inflationary costs of health care before we created medicare and medicaid? they ran the same as every other aspect of our inflation. in other words, there was
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9